Saturday, January 21, 2017

There is no quick-fix for public education

I'm going to come right out and say it.. yes, I'm a teacher.. I'm sure the name of the blog gave it away only subtly. But I need you to know, I'm not writing this to bash our new President's pick for Sec. of Ed. You can find, and have probably already read plenty of stories, blogs, and posts about her.

Instead, I'd like to take the time to agree that our current system of education is not great. It's not the best for all students across this great country of ours. I know that there are plenty of people that struggle every day sending their kids to the local public school. It might be the teachers, the administrators, other kids, home life, educational programs, or a multitude of other possibilities. My wife and I have struggled at times sending our kids to the local public school for our own reasons. We've wished for other alternatives, and then we've gone out to find them.

But, we've had the ability to do that. We've been able to move, make long drives, and take financial chances to find the right educational environment for our kids. It's not been easy. In fact there have been countless arguments, and nights where we've cried ourselves to sleep wondering why it has to be so hard. And I'll admit that we have it better than most, but we are not even middle class. Lower middle? ..probably. It's still been a struggle.

I bring this up, because I agree that creating educational options for kids is very important. But vouchers isn't the route to take. Good to great schools are limited in space regardless on whether you have a voucher or not. Parents wanting to use a voucher will be limited in ability to get their students to out-of-district schools. And honestly, how will the government oversee the fairness of this voucher program nationwide?

I just know that it's another "All-In" option with the hope of a quick fix. But, there isn't a quick fix option for the issues surrounding public education. The problem isn't common core or standardized testing. It isn't school funding, teacher unions, or unqualified teachers. In fact, all of these educational hot topics distract from what is really damaging public education. And that's fear.

People are afraid. Parents, students, teachers, administrators, anyone that is in contact with education in any way is afraid. The best schools are the ones that have been able to squash the fear. The kids feel safe being there. The parents feel safe knowing the kids are getting fair learning opportunities. The teachers feel safe knowing that they are respected for the professionals that they are. And the Admins feel safe, knowing that they get to work in a place of trust within the community. At these schools, learning is about the growth of each student intellectually and civically through investigative projects and group work that is led of the natural inquisitive qualities of kids. And it's all possible because they aren't afraid to take educational chances.

These schools are rare, and are commonly found in communities that are generally wealthy. It's in these communities that people don't have to worry about income, health care, or the everyday safety of their children just walking to school. They are living a life we should call middle class. A life that the service industry in our country doesn't provide even at 60 hours a week.

What is wrong with our public education system has more to do with the national social injustice against those that live in our least financially stable communities than it does with Common Core or unions. We need a Sec. of Ed. that is willing to speak loudly to the need of more governmental support for the families that can barely take care of themselves, or are struggling to simply get by while the adults in the house work multiple jobs.

Now, before you step away from this post thinking I'm about to go on some liberal tirad, please understand that I've voted along both party lines in my life. I have relied on state aid with a college degree, and family to support. I've taught in a school where kids lived each day not knowing what they would eat or where they would sleep. I grew up in suburban comfort with a CFO papa and stay at home mom. I've worked in sales and management on an hourly wage busting my butt to make it ahead. I've walked away from jobs and into stints in newspaper delivery and waiting tables all with a college degree. I see the drive and hustle of the adult students in my college night class that I teach. I've seen all sides of struggle, and the hard work it takes to raise a family as best you can.

And what I've learned is that if we stripped away the struggle and fear of having to simply survive, our schools would be amazing places of safety and inquisitive discovery that allow all kids the chance to learn. If
we treated the population of our GREAT country with kindness and understanding, then our schools will be more open for all types of learning potential. But, if we continue to keep populations of our country living in suffering poverty, or in a drowning middle class then all types of education suffers, because the fear and blame will continue to spread. WE will continue to look for quick fixes that have no impact on the overall improvement in making all schools better. Our problem is a societal problem that our elected governing officials need to want to help fix. When we work together to remove some of the burden throughout our country, then education will improve. Vouchers aren't the answer. Destroying common core isn't the answer. Taking care of the people of the country is the answer. When we all get back to living comfortable lives, then we will see education excellence return to the core of our nation. This is what our Sec. of Education has to preach to our President, members of Congress, and the Senate.


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